Photographer Neil Zeller snaps up the #OtherHandChallenge

Neil Zeller took the Beakerhead #OtherHandChallenge and showed us that when it comes to handling the camera, the camera is the boss!

Donations to Beakerhead for the creation of life-long learning programs at the crossroads of art and science, are always welcome and appreciated – click here to donate.

Show, Don’t Tell – Photography and Graphic Design Exhibition

When Beakerhead erupted for five days in September, 22 photographers and 15 graphic artists set out to capture the visual stories taking shape. Dozens of brilliant photographs and images were the result. Now, renowned photographer, George Webber, has selected 33 of the most intriguing for a special exhibition of the best of Beakerhead 2015.

Why 33?

On the Newton scale, 33 is the temperature at which water boils. And when water boils, you get steam, and steam is the acronym used in educational circles to refer to the convergence of science, technology, engineering, art and math. It’s just good chemistry!

The 33 artworks will be on display and available for sale in a 12-day exhibition titled Show, Don’t Tell at the Peanut Gallery in John Fluevog Shoes (207 8 Ave SW, Gallery Floor).

PHOTOGRAPHER AND ARTIST LINE-UP: click here

Photographers: Shawn Bishop – Inno Delarmente III – Clare Gibson – Andre Goulet – Jackie Ho – Denise Kitagawa – Chris Malloy – Brett Morrison – Nic Sharkey – Gilles Thibault – Gemma Wallace.

Graphics Artists: Carolyn Fisher – Sam Hester – Alanna Kho – Kelly Lai – James Liswed – Michael Mateyko – Jarett Sitter – Stephanie Stobart – Tilby Forbis – Kipling West.

Film artist: Vera Hill

SHOW, DON’T TELL VISITING HOURS

Mon-Wed: 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

Thu-Sat: 10:00 am – 7:00 pm (NB: Sat, Dec 12 closes at 3:00 pm)

Sun: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Proceeds from the sale will be shared by the artist and Beakerhead Creative Society, a registered Canadian charity that helps students of all ages learn at the crossroads of art, science and engineering!

Beakerhead Photography Team: Info Session

A 15-member, volunteer Beakerhead Photography Team captured the quirky essence of this art, science and engineering spectacle in 2014. It’s now time for the next Beakerhead Photography Team!

If you are interested in being part of this team in 2015, you are invited to an information session to learn about the team composition, behind-the-scenes access and recognition on a global stage. Attendance at this session is required for all interested team members. PREREQUISITES: Own camera, a portfolio of previous work, and willingness to be a part of something awesome!

RSVP HERE

Space is limited to first 40 registrants. As part of registration, you’ll be requested to e-mail a URL link to your photography portfolio to the chair of the Beakerhead Photography Team, Neil Zeller

Calling Awesome Photographers!

In 2014, more than 73,000 people took part in Beakerhead and over 165 million media impressions were generated, led by riveting photographs that made their way around the world.

How?

A 15-member, volunteer Beakerhead Photography Team captured the quirky essence of this art, science and engineering spectacle.

It’s now the new year and time for the next Beakerhead Photography Team!

If you are interested in being part of this team in 2015, you are invited to an information session to learn about the team composition, behind-the-scenes access and recognition on a global stage. Attendance at this session is required for all interested team members.

Beakerhead Photography Team 2015 Info Session

Tuesday, February 24

6:30 – 8:00 pm

#101 – 1615 10 Ave SW, Calgary, AB

Up to 20 participants will make up the Beakerhead Photography Team for the 2015 event. Details of the selection process will be discussed at the info session.

PREREQUISITES: Own camera, a portfolio of previous work, and willingness to be a part of something awesome!

RSVP Here

Space is limited to first 40 registrants. As part of registration, you’ll be requested to e-mail a URL link to your photography portfolio to the chair of the Beakerhead Photography Team, Neil Zeller

Dark Night, Star Light

Partner feature in the Wonderment of Beakerhead 2014: Photo Recap.

In 2014, The Rothney Astrophysical Observatory launched the Dark Night, Star Light Photography Contest in the run-up to Beakerhead. Dozens of photographers entered and the winning photographs were displayed at Studio C during Beakerhead.

Learn more about the winning photographs: click here

Thanks again to the University of Calgary’s Rothney Astrophysical Observatory and Studio C for organizing this eye-opening event.

What is light pollution? Light pollution is any light that shines where it is not needed nor wanted. Light pollution is a phenomenon of twentieth century with increased development and Calgary is an example of the impact of high levels of artificial light. Light pollution can be decreased through efficient and mindful lighting equipment and design. The goal of this contest is to illustrate some areas where light pollution is evident and to encourage communities to work together towards solutions of light pollution reduction.
Photo by Cynthia Radford
Photo by Cynthia Radford
Photo by Denise Kitagawa
Photo by Denise Kitagawa

Top photo by Cynthia Radford

Click here to see more photos

Creativity, Connection, Collaboration

A Beakerhead Photo Team Member’s Perspective …

Reprinted with permission by Out and About with GeoKs

I’ve noticed that the words creativity, connection and collaboration seem to be grouped together in a lot of different contexts these days: the workplace, schools, politics and even everyday life.

My 2014 Beakerhead experience prompted me to consider the threads of creativity, connection and collaboration in my day-to-day activities. For the past few months, I’ve been mulling around questions like:

  • What changes would I like to make in order to live a more creative life?
  • How can I build on the connections to the Calgary arts community that I made as a member of the Beakerhead photography team?
  • I already collaborate with many talented people on some not-so-creative fronts. Am I ready to apply those skills to an arts-based project?

With the hope of bringing some clarity to my early, vague ideas on how I might answer those questions, I registered to attend Creative Calgary Congress 2014. The day was structured to encourage interaction and I met several talented local artists (including Chris Cromwell, Gisa Mayer, Carla Pelkey and David Christensen), representatives from several arts and community organizations, and even a couple of entrepreneurs who have made a business out of providing goods and services to the arts community.

The keynote address included a lot of material that was new to me (although I later learned that most of it was familiar to those who have long been part of the arts community). I learned more about hoarding than I ever could have imagined. I was introduced to the term social capital (a term that came into common use years after I completed Sociology 101) and have since done a bit of reading on the structural, relational, and cognitive clusters of social capital. But the one point that most intrigued me was Erik Takeshita’s definition of artist: one who professes and practices the conscious use of skill and creative imagination.

Why? Because it got me thinking about whether I consider myself an artist.

I started to work on developing my photographic capabilities when I committed to my first Project 365 in 2008. For the next 5 years, my photos slowly improved but were entirely about documenting the where/what/when/who details of life. In 2013, three things happened:

  1. Along with the rest of the family, I took a one-day photo workshop that inspired me to (finally) move off “auto” mode;
  2. I started experimenting with camera settings, with composition, with intentional camera movement and other aspects of photography; and
  3. In order to maximize my learning from all that experimenting, I started reading about photography – not only basic technical stuff, but also anything on creative visioning and/or techniques written by a wide range of photographers.
    Over the past couple of years, I have moved away from strictly documentary photography. Now, at least part of the time, I work to capture a moment of light and shadow in a particular way because I want to convey a feeling, an idea or a sense of place – all of which aligns pretty nicely with the above definition of artist.

So has all of that thinking brought me any closer to answering to my initial questions about creativity, connection and collaboration? I think so.

First off, while I’ll continue to create documentary photographs (I still like the idea of an annual photo book), I will work hard to make more and better creative photographs (with the aim of inspiring others to find ways of connecting with nature).

Second, I will continue to support the creative Calgary community by making and sharing photographs about Studio C and public art in Calgary (with the aim of inspiring others to explore public art). I will continue to volunteer my time and creative energy to support Beakerhead! I have an idea related to showing some of my work in print (until now, I’ve only showed my work online).

And finally, I have started mulling over a new idea that would involve a massive collaboration with other Calgary photographers (but it’s too early in the thinking process to share any details).

I look forward to continuing to explore creativity, connection and collaboration in future blog posts. What do you think about all the talk about creativity, connection and collaboration? How does creativity factor into your life?

Dark Night, Star Light

Capturing light pollution in Calgary and in the region could be a winning photograph and make positive change!

The Rothney Astrophysical Observatory launches the Dark Night, Star Light Photography Contest in the run-up to Beakerhead 2014.

The purpose of the Dark Night, Star Light Photography Contest is to raise awareness of present light pollution in our city and education and resources for reducing the amount of artificial light in the City of Calgary and surrounding regions.

Light pollution is any light that shines where it is not needed nor wanted. Light pollution is a phenomenon of twentieth century with increased development and Calgary is an example of the impact of high levels of artificial light. Light pollution can be decreased through efficient and mindful lighting equipment and design. The goal of this contest is to illustrate some areas where light pollution is evident and to encourage communities to work together towards solutions of light pollution reduction.

Dark Night, Star Light Photography Contest theme: Photos submitted should be themed around examples of how light pollution impacts astronomy, sleep, cultural sites, ecosystems, or wildlife. The photograph locations are limited to Calgary and the surrounding regions of the Foothills and Rockyview municipalities. Open for submission by any photography enthusiasts of 18 years old or older. First place $1,000 (cdn), second place $500 (cdn) and third place $250 (cdn) will be awarded along with seven honourable mentions, and the winners will be part of the Dark Night, Star Light exhibit at Studio C during the Beakerhead 2014. The photos will be judged by an independent five member panel.

Studio C is an award-winning collaborative art centre in downtown Calgary – a studio and gallery open to the public. The Centre opened in 2005 and continues to innovate through art, building diverse and inclusive communities.Studio C is an initiative of Prospect – a non-profit organization that breaks barriers and employs change to build a productive Alberta workforce.

What:                        RAO and Studio C, #502, 237 8 Ave SE, 5th floor Burns Building, Photography Contest

Who:                         Jennifer Howse, University of Calgary, Physics and Astronomy

Where:                     Rothney Astrophysical Observatory, on the east side of Highway 22, 2.4 km south of the Hwy 22 and Hwy 22x interchange

When:                       Photography Contest: July 1 to August 22, 2014

Exhibit at Studio C September 10 to September 30, 2014 during Beakerhead 2014

Details:                     www.ucalgary.ca/rao Contest Rules

Partners along with Beakerhead:

No barriers to Beakerhead

Few people can say that they have never heard of Neil Zeller or been delighted by the iconic image he took of the Peace Bridge, seen by millions all over the world.

Neil Zeller is a photographic artist of the highest merit with an eye for capturing the life, not stills.

“Photography is where I cleanse my spirit, nourish my soul and am truly happy. I see the world around me in 4×6 boxes. My eyes capture wide angles, interesting corners, beams of light and faraway things. My goal is to capture in my camera, the story my eyes could never tell you.”

On April 2, Neil and Beakerhead hosted NO BARRIERS TO BEAKERHEAD: Photography Workshop. More than two dozen of Calgary’s semi-professional to professional photographers came out to get a sneak preview of what Beakerhead had in store for September 10-14 and to experience how they too could land those shots at Beakerhead that would be seen across the world.

The photographers in the workshop learned that an assignment isn’t finished when the shot list is fulfilled, it is only done when they deliver that iconic shot their client can use in their marketing and promotion well into the future. They were shown how to be technically ‘ready’ and to ‘be the boss’ at an event, being clear and bold in their direction of all involved, so they can capture that iconic moment. All this, while understanding that it is a great deal of fun to be a part of something so cool like the ‘smash up’ that is Beakerhead!

If you would like to learn more of how you can get involved in Beakerhead – click HERE!

Photo: Kelly Hofer
Photo: Kelly Hofer

 

 No Barrier shots taken on the night..

Photos: Michelle Hofer
Photos: Michelle Hofer

 

Photo: Chris Malloy
Photo: Chris Malloy

 

 

 

 

Photo: Kelly Hofer
Photo: Kelly Hofer
Photo: @GeoKs
Photo: @GeoKs 

 

Photo: Curtis Anderson
Photo: Curtis Anderson

NO BARRIERS AT BEAKERHEAD: PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP

Screen Shot 2014-03-12 at 2.50.13 PM
Neil Zeller photograph of Cmdr Chris Hadfield at the Tremendous and Curious World of Beakerhead makes it to New York’s Times Square, September 2013.

In 2013, more than 62,500 people took part in Beakerhead and more than 60 million media impressions were made all around the world, led by riveting photographs that captured the quirky essence of this new spectacle.

Calgary’s own Neil Zeller Photography and Beakerhead are offering a three-hour workshop for photographers of all stages in their photographic journey, that focuses on the “no barrier” shot… so crucial for capturing world interest to Calgary.

As part of this workshop, participants will get a preview of the visual highlights expected at Beakerhead, from September 10 to 14, and participants may be invited to become a part of our photography team for the 2014 event. As a member of the Beakerhead photography team, you will get behind-the-scenes access to Beakerhead events as well as recognition for your photography on a global stage!

PREREQUISITES: Own camera, a portfolio of work, and willingness to be a part of something awesome! Spaces limited.

This event is full.